How teachers rate job satisfaction during COVID

More than two-thirds of teachers agreed that the COVID pandemic has made the public more aware of what they do
By: | August 21, 2020
One in four teachers said they were extremely satisfied, and another 40% reported being very satisfied, a job satisfaction survey found. (GettyImages/miodrag ignjatovic)One in four teachers said they were extremely satisfied, and another 40% reported being very satisfied, a job satisfaction survey found. (GettyImages/miodrag ignjatovic)

Teachers are highly satisfied with their role in serving the community and the quality of colleagues but are less about enthusiastic about their salary and chances for advancement, according to a pair of COVID-era job satisfaction surveys.

More than two-thirds of teachers agreed that the COVID pandemic has made the public more aware of what they do, according to the survey by the Center for State & Local Government Excellence.

About 25% agreed that they were not fairly compensated for their work during the pandemic while only about 20% had considered changing jobs.

A large majority of the teachers also said they trusted state and local officials more than the federal government to make decisions about their safety.


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Still, 61% of the respondents said the pandemic has had a negative impact on them financially, and the same number said they are spending less since the outbreak.

And more than three-quarters worried the pandemic would limit what they could save for retirement while just over 70% felt their job put them somewhat at risk of being exposed to COVID-19.

And not surprisingly, nearly all the teachers surveyed (94%) said COVID had impacted their job in terms of daily instruction and where and when they work.

How teachers feel about general finances

One in four teachers said they were extremely satisfied, and another 40% reported being very satisfied, according to a separate survey that examined general job satisfaction and financial factors.


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A large majority of teachers said they get personal satisfaction from their jobs and could strike a balance their work and personal lives. They also gave high marks to their bosses and supervisors.

Some 84% said they were at least somewhat satisfied with their health benefits, and 73% gave a similar rating to their salaries. However, only about 40% of teachers reported being very satisfied with their pay.


DA’s coronavirus page offers complete coverage of the impacts on K-12.