How much will your state receive from the CARES Act?

A state-by-state breakdown of the $30.75 billion education funding under the CARES Act.
By: | April 16, 2020
Photo by Pictures of Money via Creative Commons 2.0.

A fact sheet released Thursday by the Congressional Committee on Education and Labor estimates the amount of education money each state will receive under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which provides $30.75 billion for the new Education Stabilization fund. That includes:

  • $3 billion for the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund, which governors can use at their discretion to support their K-12 and higher ed needs related to COVID-19
  • $13 billion for the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund, which states can use for a wide range of purposes, including buying computers and hot spots for online learning, supplies for cleaning and sanitation, paying for professional development for educators and supporting access to instruction for students with disabilities.
  • $14 billion for the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund, which is paid directly to higher education institutions.

Scroll down to see how much your state is estimated to receive.

The CARES Act also provides $3.5 billion in supplemental funding for the Child Care and Development Block Grant, which helps low-income families access child care. Supplemental funds will give assistance to child care providers to help them pay employees, maintain or resume operations, and provide child care assistance for health care workers, emergency responders, sanitation workers, and other essential workers.

The CARES Act also provides an additional $750 million in emergency funding for Head Start, which will be used to maintain access to services for children and families and provide funding for summer programming in areas of the country that are ready to reopen.

Estimated State-by-State Education and Child Care Funding under the CARES Act

Emergency education and child care funds are distributed according to formulas outlined in the CARES Act.

The table below reflects state estimates from the Congressional Research Service for the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund, state allocations (in thousands of dollars) from the Department of Health and Human Services for the Child Care and Development Block Grant, and state allocations from the Department of Education for the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund and Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund.

State

Governor’s Emergency Education Relief

Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief

Child Care and Development Block Grant

Alabama

$48,851,495

$216,948,000

$64,957,000

Alaska

$6,503,527

$38,408,000

$6,489,000

Arizona

$69,196,325

$277,423,000

$88,006,000

Arkansas

$30,663,725

$128,759,000

$41,463,000

California

$355,227,235

$1,647,306,000

$350,314,000

Colorado

$44,004,996

$120,994,000

$42,458,000

Connecticut

$27,881,682

$111,068,000

$23,504,000

Delaware

$7,916,821

$43,493,000

$9,758,000

District
of Columbia

$5,807,678

$42,006,000

$6,000,000

Florida

$173,720,728

$770,248,000

$223,605,000

Georgia

$105,720,728

$457,170,000

$144,539,000

Hawaii

$9,993,387

$43,385,000

$11,990,000

Idaho

$15,676,340

$47,855,000

$20,673,000

Illinois

$108,497,757

$569,467,000

$118,420,000

Indiana

$61,590,954

$214,473,000

$78,822,000

Iowa

$26,217,108

$71,626,000

$31,899,000

Kansas

$26,274,163

$84,529,000

$30,772,000

Kentucky

$43,799,187

$193,187,000

$67,741,000

Louisiana

$50,276,799

$286,980,000

$67,581,000

Maine

$9,273,552

$43,793,000

$10,953,000

Maryland

$45,657,990

$207,834,000

$45,822,000

Massachusetts

$50,843,703

$214,894,000

$45,699,000

Michigan

$89,432,673

$389,797,000

$100,899,000

Minnesota

$43,427,249

$140,137,000

$48,146,000

Mississippi

$34,662,872

$169,883,000

$47,131,000

Missouri

$54,643,115

$208,443,000

$66,543,000

Montana

$8,674,495

$41,295,000

$10,114,000

Nebraska

$16,357,685

$65,085,000

$20,077,000

Nevada

$26,477,349

$117,185,000

$32,926,000

New
Hampshire

$8,891,470

$37,641,000

$6,999,000

New Jersey

$68,864,994

$310,371,000

$63,058,000

New
Mexico

$22,262,663

$108,575,000

$29,443,000

New York

$164,286,083

$1,037,046,000

$163,636,000

North
Carolina

$95,638,869

$396,312,000

$118,136,000

North
Dakota

$5,932,707

$33,298,000

$6,038,000

Ohio

$104,917,025

$489,205,000

$117,441,000

Oklahoma

$39,919,354

$160,950,000

$50,006,000

Oregon

$32,507,956

$121,099,000

$38,595,000

Pennsylvania

$104,418,240

$523,807,000

$106,398,000

Puerto
Rico

$47,812,236

$349,113,000

$30,959,000

Rhode Island

$8,704,245

$46,350,000

$8,166,000

South
Carolina

$48,467,924

$216,311,000

$63,642,000

South Dakota

$7,944,013

$41,295,000

$9,021,000

Tennessee

$63,582,031

$259,891,000

$82,385,000

Texas

$307,026,008

$1,285,886,000

$371,663,000

Utah

$29,189,663

$67,822,000

$40,415,000

Vermont

$4,488,802

$31,148,000

$4,410,000

Virginia

$66,775,322

$238,599,000

$70,799,000

Washington

$56,769,263

$216,892,000

$58,657,000

West
Virginia

$16,353,314

$86,640,000

$23,162,000

Wisconsin

$46,550,411

$174,778,000

$51,640,000

Wyoming

$4,700,937

$32,563,000

$4,166,000

 Sources: Congressional Research Service (CRS), Department of Education, Department of Health and Human Services.