Biden details spending in $103B education budget plan

Proposal includes a new $1.6 billion program to support in-demand credentials for teachers
By: | May 28, 2021
English-language acquisition funding would see a significant increase in funding under President Joe Biden's proposed education budget for FY 2022.English-language acquisition funding would see a significant increase in funding under President Joe Biden's proposed education budget for FY 2022.

The Biden administration released details of its nearly $6 trillion FY 2022 budget request on Friday, including more specifics of the proposal to spend nearly $103 billion in education-related programs in the next fiscal year.

While presidential budget requests do not generally become law, they provide a sense of the spending priorities for the administration and lay down a marker for negotiations with Congress on final annual appropriations figures. Legislators have until midnight on Sept. 30 to finish work on FY 2022 appropriations bills or pass a continuing resolution to fund federal agencies to avoid a shutdown on Oct. 1. The House and Senate have yet to unveil their FY 2022 appropriations bills.

The Biden administration’s FY 2022 education budget request includes nearly flat-funding of $16.5 billion for existing Title I, Part A funding streams, with a proposed $20 billion Title I “equity grants” initiative intended to “help address long-standing funding disparities between under-resourced school districts and their wealthier counterparts” through support for “ensure teachers at Title I schools are paid competitively, ensure equitable access to rigorous curriculum, expand access to pre-kindergarten and provide meaningful incentives to examine and address inequalities in school funding systems.”

The proposal includes $15.5 billion for IDEA Part B, a $2.6 billion increase over FY 2021. It would provide $732 million for IDEA Part C, $250 million more than appropriated in FY 2021.

English-language acquisition funding would also see a significant increase from $797 million in FY 2021 to $917 million in FY 2022.

The Office for Civil Rights would also see an increase from $131 million in FY 2021 to $144 million in FY 2022.

The budget request also includes a new $1 billion fund to increase the number of school counselors, nurses, and mental health professionals in schools. It also would provide a significant increase to the Full-Service Community Schools program, from $30 million in FY 2021 to $443 million in FY 2022, as well as a new $100 million program “to help communities develop and implement strategies that would build more diverse student bodies.”

It also includes a new $1.6 billion program to support in-demand credentials for teachers, which the administration says would “provide grants to states to support additional certifications for more than 100,000 educators in high-demand areas like special education, bilingual education, career and technical education, and science, technology, engineering and mathematics.”


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“This proposal reflects the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to ensuring that student success remains at the heart of the Department of Education’s work. It calls on Congress to prioritize the physical and mental health of students and close education equity gaps, especially in underserved communities,” said Education Secretary Miguel Cardona. “We need to focus on not only recovering from the pandemic but also look towards our students’ education after the pandemic to ensure there are improved resources to build our education system back better than before. This budget ensures all students have access to high-quality, affordable postsecondary education, while also improving career pathways for students of all ages and levels.”

“The President’s budget makes good on his promise to lift our most vulnerable families out of poverty with a budget that truly prioritizes students,” said NEA President Becky Pringle. “After decades of underfunding Title I and IDEA, President Biden’s historic investments begin to fulfill longtime federal commitments to our most vulnerable students and those from the most underserved communities.”

“The 16 percent boost in domestic spending includes more than doubling Title I funding with a $20 billion increase, added investments in child care and Head Start, and a $3.1 billion increase toward fully funding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,” said AFT President Randi Weingarten. “These resources will help tackle systemic inequities that have plagued some of our most vulnerable students and will provide the funding to enable educators and school staff to return to in-person schooling and give our students the support they need.”

The following chart compares the FY 2020 enacted level, Trump administration FY 2021 request, FY 2021 enacted level, and Biden administration FY 2022 request for programs included in the Biden administration request: FY 2022 BudgetChart

 

 

 

Chart: FY 2020-22 Education Department funding requests compared

The Biden administration released details of its nearly $6 trillion FY 2022 budget request on May 28, including more specifics of the proposal to spend nearly $103 billion in education-related programs in the next fiscal year.

The following chart compares the FY 2020 enacted level, Trump administration FY 2021 request, FY 2021 enacted level, and Biden administration FY 2022 request for K-12 education programs included in the Biden administration request.

Chart: Comparison of FY 2020-22 U.S. Education Department funding proposals

U.S.
Education Department Program

FY
2020 enacted level
, Pub. L. No. 116-94

Trump administration
FY
2021 request

FY 2021
enacted level, Pub. L. No. 116-260.

Biden
administration FY
2022 request

Title I, Part A

$16.3 billion

0

$16.5 billion

$16.5 billion

Title I Equity Grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

$20 billion

Title I, Part C, Migrant

$375 million

0

$375 million

 $376 million

Title I, Part D, Neglected and Delinquent

$48 million

0

$48 million

 $48 million

Title II Supporting Effective Instruction
State Grants

$2.1 billion

0

$2.1 billion

 $2.1 billion

Title III, English Language Acquisition

$787 million

0

$797 million

 $917 million

Title IV, Part A, Student Support and
Academic Enrichment Grants

$1.2 billion

0

$1.2 billion

 $1.2 billion

Title IV, Part B, 21st Century Community
Learning Centers

$1.2 billion

0

$1.3 billion

$1.3 billion 

Title V, Part B, Rural Education

$186 million

0

$188 million

 $193 million

Education for Homeless Children and Youths

$102 million

0

$106 million

$106 million 

Teacher and School Leader Incentive Grants

$200 million

0

$220 million

$220 million 

Charter School Grants

$440 million

0

$440 million

 $440 million

Full-Service Community Schools

$79 million

0

$30 million

$443 million

School Safety National Activities

$105 million

0

$106 million

$116 billion 

Promise Neighborhoods

$80 million

0

$81 million

$81 million 

School-Based Health Professionals

N/A

N/A

N/A

$1 billion

Career and Technical Education

$1.3 billion

$2 billion

$1.3 billion

$1.4 billion 

IDEA Part B Grants to States

$12.8 billion

$12.9 billion

$12.9 billion

$15.5 billion

IDEA Part C

$477 million

$477 million

$482 million

$732 million

Parent Information Centers (IDEA National
Activities)

$27 million

$27 million

$27 million

 $30 million

Indian Education

$181 million

$181 million

$181 million

 $191 million

Institute of Education Sciences

$623 million

$565 million

$642 million

$737 million 

Office for Civil Rights

$130 million

$130 million

$131 million

$144 million

State Assessments

$378 million

$368 million

$378 million

$378 million 

Sources: Congressional FY 2020 budget documents, Trump administration FY 2021 budget request, Biden
administration FY 2022 budget request.

Charles Hendrix covers education funding and other Title I issues for LRP Publications.