As Some Schools Plunge into Technology, Poor Schools Are Left Behind

Courtney Williams's picture
Wednesday, January 25, 2012

On a recent Friday morning, 15-year-old Jerod Franklin stared at his hands as he labored to type up memories of the first time he grilled steak. Next to him, classmate Brittany Levy tackled a piece about a trip to the hospital.

The Bronzeville Scholastic Institute ninth-graders were working on writing assignments in the school's homework lab, whose 24 computers are shared by nearly a thousand students from the three schools that occupy DuSable High School's campus on the South Side.

"The ratio of computers to students is absurd," said English teacher Andrew Flaherty, a veteran educator who reports that many of his students cannot afford computers at home and don't get enough time to use them at school. As a result, Bronzeville Scholastic students born into a digital era struggle with basic skills, such as saving work to a flash drive and setting margins in Microsoft Word.

At a time when awareness of technology and its potential uses in school is growing nationally, this public high school of 550 often feels like a poster child for the so-called digital divide.

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