Advertising in Schools Becoming More Common

Marion Herbert's picture
Monday, June 4, 2012

Financially struggling schools nationwide are increasing the volume of advertising that children see in the halls, at football games and even on their report cards.

School administrators say that with a public unwilling to adequately fund K-12 education, they're obligated to find new ways to keep teachers in classrooms.

 

"We know that we can't continue to only look at ways to cut, we also need to be innovative about the assets we have and learn how to bring in more revenue," says Trinette Marquis, a spokeswoman for the 28,000-student Twin Rivers Unified School District in McClellan, Calif.

 

Twin Rivers this spring signed a deal with the Colorado-based Education Funding Partners (EFP), a for-profit corporation, with a goal of bringing $100 million to major public school districts by 2015, company President Mickey Freeman says.

 

"There's a way to marry large companies and large districts without having to sacrifice morality," he says. "The public isn't paying for public education anymore."

 

Advertising in schools is not a new concept and has been part of athletic facilities and school buses for years. But Dax Gonzalez, communications manager for the Texas Association of School Boards, says more schools are turning to advertising.

 

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